Burnt Teapot

So I started the teapot up today, and went downstairs to check one thing. Ten minutes later I came up and there was no whistle. After checking the teapot, there was no water.

With our old crappy teapot, I wouldn’t care. Let it cool down, whatever. Of course this teapot is a 19/10 stainless teapot from the Eva Zeisel by Chantal collection, interestingly no longer sold (although the enamel clad one is). We inherited it from Aunt Lynn, and she liked nice stuff, and it is beautiful. After I cooked it, not so much.

Eva Zeisel by Chantal teakettle
This is the teakettle I destroyed.
It was discolored about two inches up from the bottom, with some burnt spots of something all over. It just got really hot, and burnt every piece of dirt on it. SO I started Googling and found from Chantal’s Use & Care:

If water has been boiled dry from the teakettle TURN OFF HEAT and do not remove teakettle until it has cooled. Leaving a dry teakettle on a hot burner can melt enamel/aluminum base and damage the teakettle and burner. This could be a possible source of fire.

Nice. The flame was on real low, since I knew I wasn’t sitting there, so maybe the damage is not bad. Another post recommended Bar Keeper’s Friend. It has saved me before, as it is a very nice fine abrasive. Another post says the metal is damaged beyond repair, and the wife will kill me. Well, the post didn’t really say that, I did.

So I started polishing with some BKF with a few drops of water, and used my clean hands. Luckily, most of the discoloration came off, except near the bottom, probably where the heat was highest. Good thing I a) caught it soon, and b) used low heat. Some of the burnt crust came off too, so it really looks good now.

The teakettle itself is nice, but not as functional as the cheapy. You could operate the cheapy with one hand, you need to remove the Chantal plug with your hand without getting burned by steam. Get used to it. It does not whistle reliably, either. B**ch, b**ch, b**ch.

One thought on “Burnt Teapot

  1. UPDATE: This design is flawed in all except appearance. The lid cannot be operated one-handed, and when you pour boiling water from a full pot (as when making iced tea) the water flashing behind the lid creates steam, and the pressure forces boiling water out of the spout at high speed. I have soaked a 1 foot radius pouring tea. Not good. The old Mirro never did that.

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